Tuesday, July 29, 2008

The Chuck sets the record straight on those pesky Gallup Tracking Polls



This morning had The Chuck being honest and assertive when giving his take on the Gallup Tracking Poll. He finds them to be bunk and said later on Hardball that no poll holds water (barring a mishap from either camp) until the day after the first debate.

He also brought up a hell of a side-note to all of this that hopefully other news organizations will run with, that Obama's field is being under-sampled. The Chuck reported this fact is causing great uneasiness amongst Republican pollsters. A new perspective and elegantly simple point when you imagine who is sitting home by the phone available to be asked questions: older voters. Otherwise known as the segment of the population who don't have caller I.D.

Also, great repartee with Mike Murphy, who appeared to be slightly punchy due to the West Coast time difference. Keep the man punchy; his cake analogy was priceless. Although we all could've done without the Obama/Akaka joke.

3 comments:

eb said...

This was a great segment. Gotta love Chuck.

I wish there was an MSNBC video "flyout" for "Chuck Todd" the way there is one for Morning Joe, Hardball, etc. I bet it would get more hits than the other show flyouts combined. (Does that even make sense? It's late and I'm not sure I'm explaining this properly. But basically, I want MSNBC to create a Chuck Todd video channel...)

Btw, the Chuck Todd Newsvine Q&A is tomorrow at 3:30-4:30 PM ET, here:
http://chucktodd.newsvine.com/_news/2008/07/30/1708056-newsvine-qa-chuck-todd-on-us-politics

Lenore said...

Great idea — that would make things much easier, wouldn't it? Listen up, MSNBC.

Re. the Q&A, it would be good if Chuck could say no to doing Hardball those days, although something else would likely tear him away...

michelle said...

There was a great cartoon in The New Yorker this week that made me think of The Chuck's disgust of the Gallup Tracking Polls. It said: "Look, we've got to improve our voter-tracking algorithms if we want to make more accurate wild-ass guesses."